Exhibits

Gallery: Art Connections Gallery 908 Main Street, Bastrop Texas 512 581-1799 http://artconnectionsgallerybastrop.com/


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Sunday, May 30, 2010

WW II Memorial, Gainsville, Texas

Flags near Denton, Texas.

On our way home today we stopped at the Visitors Welcome Center as we crossed into Texas. There is a WW II Memorial there. This link will show you what is on the sculpture. There are 800 names on the plaques behind the statue of the 103rd Infantry Division who lost their lives in World War II.

I think I took photos before, but today it holds a special meaning as tomorrow is Memorial Day.

Here are some photos I took today. Reading about this statue makes you stop and think. We need to thank our military for our freedom.





What more is there to say?

Have a safe and great Memorial Day.

**************

I added this Monday at 9:25 a.m.:

A Poem Worth Reading

He was getting old and paunchy
And his hair was falling fast,
And he sat around the Legion,
Telling stories of the past.

Of a war that he once fought in
And the deeds that he had done,
In his exploits with his buddies;
They were heroes, every one.

And 'tho sometimes to his neighbors
His tales became a joke;
All his buddies listened quietly
For they knew where of he spoke.

But we'll hear his tales no longer,
For ol' Bob has passed away,
And the world's a little poorer
For a Soldier died today.

He won't be mourned by many,
Just his children and his wife.
For he lived a ordinary,
Very quiet sort of life.

He held a job and raised a family,
Going quietly on his way;
And the world won't note his passing,
'Tho a Soldier died today.

When politicians leave this earth,
Their bodies lie in state,
While thousands note their passing,
And proclaim that they were great.

Papers tell of their life stories
From the time that they were young,
But the passing of a Soldier
Goes unnoticed, and unsung.

Is the greatest contribution
To the welfare of our land,
Some jerk who breaks his promise
And cons his fellow man?

Or the ordinary fellow
Who in times of war and strife,
Goes off to serve his country
And offers up his life?

The politician's stipend
And the style in which he lives,
Are often disproportionate,
To the service that he gives.

While the ordinary Soldier,
Who offered up his all,
Is paid of with a medal
And perhaps a pension, small.

It is not the politicians
With their compromise and ploys,
Who won for us the freedom
That our country now enjoys.

Should you find yourself in danger,
With your enemies at hand,
Would you really want some cop-out,
With his ever waffling stand?

Or would you want a Soldier
His home, his country, his kin,
Just a common Soldier,
Who would fight until the end.

He was just a common Soldier,
And his ranks are growing thin,
But his presence should remind us
We may need his like again.

For when countries are in conflict,
We find the Soldier's part
Is to clean up all the troubles
That the politicians start.

If we cannot do him honor
While he's here to hear the praise,
Then at least let's give him homage
At the ending of his days.

Perhaps just a simple headline
In the paper that might say:
"OUR COUNTRY IS IN MOURNING,
A SOLDIER DIED TODAY."

2 comments:

Teresa said...

So glad you posted this. It's a wonderful poem.... a lot of truth in there. We had a family cook out on Memorial Day and when our son-in-law asked the blessing he remembered, and called each by name, his four buddies that were lost while he and his National Guard Unit was in Iraq. Brought a lump to my throat as I thought of those families who might also be having a cookout... but missing an important family member. Thank God for all of our military. They do indeed deserve respect, honor and recognition.

Jo Castillo said...

Teresa, thank you. You know how much I appreciate your thoughts. I'm so proud of your son-in-law. Thank him, too.

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About Me

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Bastrop, Texas, United States
I Grew up in a small town , Magdalena, New Mexico. I enjoy art and the pleasure other people get from my work. I always donate some of my sales and art to charities, especially for children. That started in Bolivia with Para los NiƱos. (Link on sidebar) "I cannot pretend to feel impartial about colors. I rejoice with the brilliant ones and am genuinely sorry for the poor browns." -- Winston Churchill